Disclosure: This site has affiliate links to language products including those on Amazon. As an Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases at no cost to you. Thank you.
Disclosure: This site contains affiliate links to language learning products. We receive a commission for purchases made via these links, at no cost to you. Thank you.

What’s My Name In German? How To Say Your Name FLUENTLY.

whats my name in german

If you’re wondering…

”What’s my name in German?” or How to spell my name in German?”… 

Well, don’t worry.

This quick guide will tell you how to say your name in German. So of course, you’ll naturally learn a little bit of German pronunciation too, okay? So….

  • Review the pronunciation rules in part 1.
  • If you’re lazy, just scroll down to part 2 the list of common translated names.
  • And learn bonus lines for introducing yourself in German in part 3.

By the way,  you should also hear REAL German. So, here’s a free German audio lesson from GermanPod101 – a popular German learning program. Press play and learn how to introduce yourself.

Part 1: German Pronunciation Rules

To say your name in German, first let’s brush up on 6 German pronunciation rules. Knowing these will help you say the name correctly.

Rule 1: The German R is guttural

Guttural means that it comes from your throat. To get an idea of how the R is produced, take a sip of water, tilt your head back, and gargle. Try to say “ahh.” You should feel your throat vibrate. Now you can try to reproduce this sound without the water. 

  • Example: Robert (ROH-BEHRT)

Rule 2: German vowels are pure

What does that mean?

It means you only make one sound when you produce them. English has 4 “diphthong-pronounced” vowels (a,i,o,u), which means that you make two sounds when you pronounce each. For example, when you pronounce “A,” you make 2 sounds: “e-eey.” This is not the case in German. Vowels can be either long or short, but they are not diphthongs. 

  • Example: David (DAH-VID)
  • Example: Jakob (YAH-COP)

Rule 3: Pronunciation of CH is different in German

CH sounds differently depending on what letter it stands in front of: 

  • If you see “ch” after an “e” or “i,” the pronunciation resembles a hissing cat. You can try reproducing this sound by touching the roof of your mouth with the middle part of your tongue.
    • Example: Erich (EH-RIH)  – The H is softer and is similar to the “H” in “huge.”
  • However, if you see “ch” after an “a,” “o,” or “u,” the pronunciation is harsher and it is produced in the back of your throat.  It is similar to the English “h,” but it is produced further back in your throat. 
    • Example: Richard (REE-HART)

Rule 4: The letter “W” is pronounced like the English “V”

When you see a name containing the letter “W,” you must pronounce it like the English “V.”

  • Example: Wilhelm (VIL-HELM)

Rule 5: The letter “J” is pronounced like the English “Y”

The German “J” sounds like the “Y” in “year:” 

  • Example: Josef (YOH-SEF)
  • Example: Jana (YAH-NAH)

Rule 6: The letters “B: and “D” are hardened if they are at the end of a syllable or word 

If you see a “B” at the end of a syllable or word, you need to pronounce it like the English “P.”

  • Example: Jakob (YAH-KOP)

If you see a “D” at the end of a syllable or word, you need to pronounce it like the English “T.”

  • Example: Eduard (EH-DOO-ART)
  • Example: Richard (REE-HART)

Now that you know a few rules, let’s get to the actual names.

Part 2: Common English Names in German

Here are some English names translated to German.

If you’re wondering, “How to spell my name in German?”….

Take a look below. You can refer to this chart if you want to know your name equivalent in German. Be sure to learn the right pronunciation.

Male Names

English

German

Pronunciation

Anthony

Anton

AHN-TOHN

Andrew

Andreas

AHN-DREH-AHS

Benjamin

Benjamin

BEN-YAH-MEEN

Charles

Karl

KARL

Christopher

Christoph

CHRIS-TOHF

Daniel

Daniel

DAH-NYEL

David

David

DAH-VIT

Dennis

Dennis

DEH-NIS

Dominic

Dominik

DOH-MIH-NEEK

Edward

Eduard

EH-DOO-ART 

Eric

Erich

EH-RIH (H similar to the H in huge)

Frederick

Frederik 

FREH-DE-RICK

George

Georg

GAY-ORG

Jacob

Jakob

YAH-KOP

John

Johannes 

YOH-HA-NES

Joseph

Josef 

YOH-SEF

Matthew

Matthias

MAH-TEE-AHS

Michael

Michael

MEE-HA-EHL

Nicholas

Nikolaus

NEE-KOH-LAH-OOHS

Peter

Peter

PEH-TAHR

Phillip

Philipp

FEE-LIP

Richard

Richard

REE-HART

Robert

Robert

ROH-BEHRT

William

Wilhelm

VIL-HELM

Xavier

Xaver

KSAA-VAH

Female Names

English

German

Pronunciation

Alexandra

Alexandra

AH-LEH-KSAHN-DRAH

Anna

Anna

AH-NAH

Bridget

Birgit

BEER-GIT (G AS IN GEEK)

Caroline

Karoline

KAH-ROH-LEE-NAEH

Catherine

Kathrin

KAH-TREEN

Charlotte

Charlotte

CHAHR-LOHT-TAEH

Christine

Christine

CHRIS-TEE-NAEH

Diane

Diane 

DEE-AH-NAEH

Elizabeth

Elisabeth

EH-LEE-ZAH-BET

Emily

Emilia

EH-MEE-LEE-AH

Helen

Helene 

HEH-LEH-NAEH

Jacquelyn

Jacqueline

SHAH-KLEEN

Jane

Jana

YAH-NAH

Julia

Julia

YOOH-LEE-AH

Lara

Lara

LAH-RAH

Laura

Laura

LA-OOH-RAH

Leah

Lea

LEH-AH

Lily

Lili

LIH-LEE

Marie

Marie

MAH-REE

Melany

Melanie

MEH-LAH-NEE

Michelle

Michaela

MEE-HAH-EH-LAH

Patricia

Patricia

PAH-TREE-TSEE-AH

Sarah

Sara

SAH-RAH

Sophia

Sofia

SOH-FEE-AH

Veronica

Veronika

VEH-ROH-NEE-KAH

Part 3: How to Introduce Yourself in German

Now that you know how to pronounce your name in German…

Let’s learn how to introduce yourself in German. — formally and informally. First of all, you must know that there are two forms for “YOU” in German: “DU” and “SIE.”

  • You use “DU” when you are talking to a friend or someone from your same age group.
  • You use “SIE” in formal situations, when you are talking to someone you don’t know or an older person. 
  • The verb is conjugated differently depending on whether you use “DU” or “SIE.”

1. Wie heißt du? “What’s your name?” (informal)

  • Wie heißt du?
    • Literal translation: What do you call yourself? (informal)
    • Meaning: What’s your name?
    • Pronunciation: VEE HI-SST DOO?
    • The German consonant “ß” is pronounced “ss.”
    • The German vowel combination “EI” is pronounced like the “I” in “island.”

2. Wie heißen Sie? What’s your name? (formal)

  • Wie heißen Sie?
    • Literal translation: What do you call yourself? (formal)
    • Meaning: What’s your name?
    • Pronunciation: VEE HI-SSEN ZEE?
    • “Sie” must have a capital “S,” since it means “YOU (formal).” When it has a lowercase “s” it can mean “she” or “they.” 

3. Ich heiße ____ – I call myself ____

The literal translation of the verb “heißen” is “to call oneself.” Note how the verb is conjugated differently depending on whether you use DU (informal) or SIE (formal). Now let’s see how you conjugate it with ICH (I), when you want to respond to that question.

  • Ich heiße _____
    • Literal translation: I call myself… / I am called …
    • Meaning: My name is…
    • Pronunciation: EEH (h as in huge) HI-SAEH …

4. Ich bin _____ I am _____

You can also use this alternative to introduce yourself, which literally means: “I am…”

  • Ich bin _____
    • Literal translation / Meaning: I am…
    • Pronunciation: EEH (h as in huge) bin

5. Mein Name ist _____. My name is _____.

This is a more formal way to introduce yourself.  It literally means: “My name is…”

  • Mein Name ist _____ 
    • Literal translation / Meaning: My name is…
    • Pronunciation: MINE NAH-MAEH IST …
    • Notice the vowel combination EI appear again in “MEIN.” It makes it sound like the English word “mine.” 

Now, how would you say “nice it meet you” in German?

You’ll learn a few formal and informal ways, okay? Cool.

6. Es freut mich, dich kennenzulernen.  I am glad to get to know you. (Informal)

    • Informal
    • Literal translation: I am glad to get to know you
    • Pronunciation: ES FROH-EET MIH (h as in huge) DIH (h as in huge) KEHN-NEN-TSOO-LEHR-NEHN
    • Shorter version: Freut mich!
      • Pronunciation: FROH-EET MIH!

7. Schön, dich kennenzulernen. Nice to get to know you. (Informal)

    • Literal translation: Nice to get to know you
    • Pronunciation: SHON DIH (h as in huge) KEHN-NEN-TSOO-LEHR-NEHN
      • Ö sounds similar to the “U” in “turn.”

8. Es freut mich, Sie kennenzulernen. Nice to meet you. (formal)

    • Pronunciation: ES FROH-EET MIH (h as in huge) ZEE KEHN-NEN-TSOO-LEHR-NEHN
    • Shorter version: Freut mich!

9. Schön, Sie kennenzulernen. Nice to meet you. (formal)

    • Pronunciation: SHON ZEE KEHN-NEN-TSOO-LEHR-NEHN
      • Ö sounds similar to the “U” in “turn.”

Conclusion

Now, you don’t have to wonder what your name is in German.

You learned some basic pronunciation rules.

And you how how to introduce yourself.

Now, introduce yourself in German in the comments below.

– The Main Junkie

Learn German with Free Podcasts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*