What is my name in French? How to translate your name.

Ah, finding out what your name is in French is magical, isn’t it?

It’s the rite of passage for any new learner.

The second you start learning the language, you want to know how to write and say your name in.

whats my name in french

Want to know what your name is in French?

  • Review the pronunciation rules below in part 1 to figure it out yourself .
  • If you’re lazy, just scroll down to part 2 the list of common translated names.
  • And learn bonus lines for introducing yourself in French in part 3.

By the way,  you should also hear REAL French. So, here’s a free French audio lesson. Press play and learn how to introduce yourself.

Part 1: French Pronunciation Rules

whats my name in french

“What’s my name in French? How will it sound like?”

Great question, glad you asked.

When learning to say your name in French, pronunciation is extremely important. So, here are some rules to help:

Rule 1: Many ending consonants are silent.

Generally speaking, consonants at the end of French words are not pronounced. However, you must be careful. C, R, F, and L are usually the exception to this rule (and they are the consonants in the word CaReFuL.) When these consonants (C, R, F and L) are at the end of the word, they are pronounced.

  • Example: Éric (AIR-EEK) The “C” is pronounced.
  • Example: Robert (ROW-BEAR) The “T” is NOT pronounced.

Rule 2: The “R” comes from deep in the throat.

The sound of the French “R” doesn’t exist in English. To pronounce it, form your mouth as if you are going to use the “K” sound. Blow air from the back of your throat. It is as if you are gargling water or trying to clear your throat.

  • Example: Françoise (FRAN-SWAZ)
  • Example: Marie (MAH-REE)

Rule 3: When “M” and “N” follow vowels, they become nasal.

Any vowel followed by an “M” or an “N” creates a nasal sound. Air has to pass through both the nose and the mouth (as opposed to using just the mouth.)

  • Example: Alain (AH-LAH)
  • Example: Damien (DAH-ME-EH)

Rule 4: The letter “I” is pronounced like the English “E.”

Anytime you see the letter “I”, treat it like an “E” when you pronounce it. Some English names already use this pronunciation rule such as Ian (EE-IN) or Nadine (NAH-DEEN).

  • Example: Lili (LEE-LEE)
  • Example: David (DAH-VEED)
Want to the learn the French alphabet and sounds? Download your free French alphabet workbook here.

Part 2: Common English Names in French

“I’m lazy. Just tell me what’s my name in French.”

Alright.

If you want to know your name equivalent and how to pronounce it in French, refer to this chart:

Male Names

American Name

French Name

Pronunciation

Andrew

André

AHN-DRAY

Charles

Charles

SHARL

Daniel

Daniel

DAN-YEL

David

David

DAH-VEED

Dennis

Denis

DUH-NEE

Dominic

Dominique

DOH-MEN-EEK

Edward

Edouard

ED-WAHRD

Eric

Éric

AIR-EEK

Fred

Frederic

FREH-DAIR-EEK

Jack

Jacques

JAHK

John

Jean

JAHN

Matthew

Matthieu

MAH-TYOU

Michael

Michel

ME-SHELL

Nicholas

Nicolas

NEE-KO-LAH

Peter

Pierre

PEE-AIR

Phillip

Philippe

FEE-LEEP

Richard

Richard

REE-SHAR

Robert

Robert

ROW-BEAR

William

Guillaume

GHEE-OHM

Xavier

Xavier

EX-HAV-EE-AY

Female Names

American Name

French Name

Pronunciation

April

Avril

AH-VREEL

Bridget

Brigitte

BREE-GHEET

Carol

Carole

CAH-ROLL

Caroline

Caroline

CAH-ROW-LEEN

Catherine

Catherine

CAH-TREEN

Chloe

Chloé

CLO-AY

Christine

Christine

CREE-STEEN

Diane

Diane

DEE-ANN

Elizabeth

Élisabeth

AY-LEE-ZAH-BET

Emily

Émilie

AY-ME-LEE

Genevieve

Geneviève

JAHN-VEE-EV

Helen

Hélène

AY-LEN

Hilary

Hilaire

EE-LAHR

Jacquelyn

Jacqueline

JAH-KLEEN

Joy

Joie

JHO-AH

Julie

Julie

JHU-LEE

Leah

Léa

LAY-AH

Lily

Lili

LEE-LEE

Michelle

Michelle

ME-SHELL

Rachel

Rachelle

RAH-SHELL

Part 3: How to Introduce Yourself in French

whats my name in french

Once you know how to say your name in French, you will need to know how to properly introduce yourself to other people. Here are some different ways to do so:

A) What’s your name in French (informal)

  • What is your name? (Literally: What do you call yourself?)
  • Tu t’appelles comment? Comment t’appelles-tu? (Informal)
  • Pronunciation: TO-TAH-PEL COH-MOHN? COH-MOHN TAH-PEL-TO?

This informal question would be used among people of the same age group. Children would use this when meeting other children their own age.

B) What’s your name in French (formal)

  • What’s your name? (Formal)
  • Comment vous appelez-vous? (Formal)
  • Pronunciation: COH-MOHN VOOZ-AH-PEL-AY-VOO?

C) My name is… in French.

This is the more polite version. When adults meet each other for the first time, this would be the proper form to use.

  • My name is______.
  • Je m’appelle ____. (Literally: I call myself ___.)
  • Pronunciation: JHE MAH-PEL ____.

D) I call myself… in French.

When someone asks you, “Tu t’appelles comment?” or “Comment vous appelez-vous?” they are saying “What do you call yourself?” using the reflexive verb, s’appeler. It makes sense to respond with “Je m’appelle” (I call myself) as it uses the same reflexive verb.

  • I call myself ___.
  • Mon nom est ____.
  • Pronunciation: MOHN NOM AY ____.

E) My name is… in French

This is the literal “My name is” response. It is acceptable to use for any occasion, but is less common than “Je m’appelle.”

  • I am ______.
  • Je suis _____.
  • Pronunciation: JHE SWEE ____.

F) Pleased to meet you in French

“Je suis” (I am) is also acceptable to use for any introduction, but it is less common than “Je m’appelle.” This phrase is also used to introduce professions or adjectives, such as, “Je suis professeur” (I am a teacher) or “Je suis timide” (I am shy.)

  • Pleased to meet you.
  • Très heureux./Très heureuse. (Literally: very happy)
  • Pronunciation: TRAY-ZUR-UH/TRAY-ZUR-UHZ

When someone introduces themselves, it is common to say “très heureux” to mean that you are very happy to meet them. Males would say “très heureux,” using the masculine form of the adjective. Females would say “très heureuse,” using the feminine form of the adjective.

Part 4: Sample Conversations

Take a look at this sample conversation between two teenagers meeting for the first time:

  • Salut*! Tu t’appelles comment?
  • Je m’appelle Thomas. Et toi**? Comment t’appelles-tu?
  • Je m’appelle Sophie.

Explanation:

*Salut (SAH-LOO) is an informal way of saying “Hi.” It is often used by younger people.

**Et toi (AY-TWA) means “and you.” It is commonly used when asking a question of someone else after they have posed the same question. It uses the informal you, toi.

Here is a conversation between two adults meeting for the first time:

  • Bonjour*! Je m’appelle Olivier. Et vous**? Comment vous appelez-vous?
  • Bonjour, Olivier. Très heureuse. Je m’appelle Natalie.

Explanation:

*Bonjour (BOHN-JHOR) is a more formal way of saying hello or good day. It is used by adults meeting for the first time.

**Et vous (AY-VOO) means “and you.” It is the formal you-form, so it is used by people who are showing respect for one another or by adults who do not know each other well. It is often used when asking a question of someone else after they have posed the same question.


Done!

Now you know how to say your name in French.

Now, introduce yourself in French in the comments below.

– The Main Junkie