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Learn Hebrew: Top 40 Hebrew Idioms & Proverbs Part 4

learn hebrew at hebrewpod101.com

Hello Junkies!

Welcome to Part 4! (Read part 3 here.)

Here are some more Hebrew idioms and proverbs.  Learn these and you’ll speak better Hebrew, get a sense of the culture and acquire some nice advice in the process.

In this post, I’ll cover the next batch of  Hebrew idioms and provide English translations and explanations so you know when and how to use them. Feel free to print this article out for your own use.

(And if you want to REALLY learn Hebrew with Audio & Video lessons from real teachers, be sure to check out HebrewPod101.com and click here)

Let’s go.

31. It’s not what one says, but rather what one does.

  • It’s not what one says, but rather what one does.
  • Lo ha’midrash hu ha’ikar, ela ha’ma’ase.

It’s kind of like “actions are louder than words” or “judge a person by his actions” type of proverb. People can say one thing but do another.

learn japanese idioms @ linguajunkie.com

32. Who is respected? One who respects his health.

  • Who is respected? One who respects his health.
  • Eize’hu me’chubad? Ha’mechabed et ha’briyot.

Who is to respect? It’s the person that respects their health. They know when is enough for them, when to rest. They have self control. And most importantly, they care for their first and only home – their body.

learn japanese idioms @ linguajunkie.com

33. One must not rely on miracles happening.

  • One must not rely on miracles happening.
  • Ein som’chin al ha’nes.

Great proverb. It means you cannot rely on miracles to happen. Chances are, they won’t. This proverb indirectly suggests that you take action instead… because a miracle is unlikely.

learn japanese idioms @ linguajunkie.com

34. Sages be careful with your words!

  • Sages be careful with your words!
  • Chachamim, hiza’haru be’divreichem!

People look up to sages, wise men and those in power. And thus, it’s important for them to be careful with their words. People take those words seriously.

learn japanese idioms @ linguajunkie.com

35. With much wealth comes many worries.

  • With much wealth comes many worries.
  • Marbe ne’chasim – marbe de’aga.

This idiom points to the downside of having “more than enough.” With wealth come new forms of problems. People want your wealth. More taxes.

learn japanese idioms @ linguajunkie.com

36.  Scholars enhance peace in the world.

  • Scholars enhance peace in the world.
  • Tal’midei cha’cha’mim marbim shalom ba’olam.

This proverb points to the importance of education for the world. Scholars look to reason, logic and understanding. If you have more of that, you have less thoughtless action – and more peace in the world.

learn japanese idioms @ linguajunkie.com

37. You can’t argue over taste or smell.

  • You can’t argue over taste or smell.
  • Al ta’am ve’al re’ach ein le’hitvake’ach.

This is the Hebrew proverb that means “to each, his own” or “you can’t argue over tastes.” Some like apples. Some like oranges. And some like to learn Hebrew language. And you can’t argue over preferences.

learn japanese idioms @ linguajunkie.com

38. Silence is better for the wise and how much more so for fools.

  • Silence is better for the wise and how much more so for fools.
  • Yafa shti’ka la’chachamim kal va’chomer latipshim.

Similar to the saying “silence is golden.” Why? The fools don’t make themselves look foolish by talking too much. And the wise, they don’t reveal too much .

learn japanese idioms @ linguajunkie.com

39.  He who watches his mouth and his tongue guards his soul from troubles.

  • He who watches his mouth and his tongue guards his soul from troubles.
  • Shomer piv u’le’shono, shomer mitsarot nafsho.

This like the proverb above, except it focuses on the wise side of things. People that talk too much tend to “say” too much. For example, unnecessary things, insulting things and anything careless – that can come back to bite them later on. Thus, he who watches what he says… protects himself.

learn japanese idioms @ linguajunkie.com

40. One may supersede the Shabbat laws in other to save a life.

  • One may supersede the Shabbat laws in other to save a life.
  • Piku’ach nefesh doche Shabbat.

See, it’s not all about religion and strict–set–in–stone rules. If you can save a life, you can supersede the laws of Shabbat. In other words, if you can, do it by any means necessary.

learn japanese idioms @ linguajunkie.com

And that’s it for part 4 of Hebrew sayings.

What do you think?

Be sure to leave a comment and let me know. If you want, print this article for your own review so you can come back to it later. It’s better to have a physical copy.

– The Main Junkie

P.S. I highly recommend this if you want to learn to Hebrew. 

Learn to speak and understand Hebrew with with Audio & Video lessons from real teachers – Sign up for free at HebrewPod101 and start learning. They have new lessons every week.

learn hebrew at hebrewpod101.com

2 thoughts on “Learn Hebrew: Top 40 Hebrew Idioms & Proverbs Part 4”

  1. Pingback: Learn the 30 Most Common Hebrew Questions

  2. I lived in Tel Aviv in Israel for 5 years due to work and so as you can imagine, I had to learn the Hebrew language in a very short space of time. Just offering my advice to anyone else looking to learn this language and that is to follow the Practical ‘Learn Hebrew’ program at:

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    It worked very well for me as I was completely fluent in the language in well under a year from following it and I didn’t have to pay massive teacher fees like my work originally advised. An absolute life saver for me and I highly recommend it to everyone.

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